Digger
July 21st, 2008

Digger

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Discussion (15)¬

  1. The Dark Ferret says:

    Well, they are sprightly in the woods.

  2. Herne might be our first strong non-evil, non-god male character. This should be fun.

  3. Beacon80 says:

    Jahim isn’t evil. He’s trying to do what he feels is best. I might not agree with him on certain points, but I’d never fault him for it.

  4. TekServer says:

    The fact that Grim Eyes apologized so readily here lends credence to comments on previous pages that suggested that she was just having some fun at Herne’s expense, and does actually like him.

    🙂

  5. Willow says:

    Or it may be one of those “Awww, the little lady is acting tough!” situations. Except, you know. With gender roles reversed.

  6. Sammi says:

    I’d say Ed’s certainly a strong character, and Owl Caller I’d give the benefit of the doubt. Ed’s strength is considerably more quiet than everyone else’s, but it’s there. It’s there when he reminds Digger she wouldn’t get far without her liver. It’s there when he takes the role of mentor and dispenses seemingly limitless wisdom time and again. It’s especially there, and a bit less quiet, when he tells Digger in no uncertain terms that she needs to deal with the badness or be partially to blame for it. Ed wasn’t strong, in the past, but killing his mate and having seventeen years to think about it has made him strong, and Digger giving him a name gave him a new life in which to use that strength.

    We haven’t seen enough of Owl Caller yet, but I’m willing to bet that when he wants to be, he’s got similar strength to that of the Hag.

  7. Sammi says:

    Also, a case might be made for Trader Manuel, but we certainly haven’t seen enough of him.

  8. TekServer says:

    I think the point, Sammi, was that none of the male characters you’ve mentioned ever actually “joined the party”; they were all “NPC’s”.

    (Sorry to resort to gamer terminology, but it fits … )

    😛

  9. BunnyRock says:

    The terminology fits and I agree, but I would still like to cast a vote for the “Ed and Owl Caller: stronger than they look” camp. The way Owl Caller stands up to Boneclaw Mother when he wants to, and the fact Ed’ hasn’t gone utterly insane in his time is testament enough.

    Plus he can draw cave paintings that link to “conspiracy of mammals.” He is that great he can break the forth wall without even being aware of it.

  10. TekServer says:

    Agreed. Ed is awesome, and I wouldn’t be surprised at all to learn that he inherited his awesomeness, to some extent, from his father Owl Caller. (Speculation.)

    🙂

  11. Gadora says:

    I’m pretty sure that Owl Caller is Ed’s uncle on his mother’s side.

  12. Elkian says:

    Holy crap Grim Eyes is capable of diplomacy

  13. Mani says:

    Owl Caller has called Ed his sister’s son. From the way they discuss their siblings so much more often than direct parents, the hyena familial structure reminds me a bit of aboriginal Australians’.

    The fact that Ed paints fantastical murals all over his cave kind of reinforces that for me, too.

    As for relevant male characters…Librarian Vo.

    And Herne is totally an NPC – he’s the guide that the DM throws their way to get them back on the right path, that gets increasingly frustrated by the party’s crazy antics and interactions (as the DM reminds them just how crazy they would sound to a normal person).

  14. JET73L says:

    Yeah, Grim Eyes totally likes Herne. So far it’s only begrudging respect, but it may eventually be as much as teammate-cousin (I hesitate to even entertain the idea that Grim Eyes could accept a non-hyena’s worthiness as a potential mate, no matter how much she respected said non-hyena. Vitrolic best friends and huntmates post-storyline seems to be at least possible, though. Think “football buddies”, or whatever sports-watching best friends call themselves).

  15. Meira says:

    Well, the term strong character has multiple meanings. Yes, there’s the character is physically, mentally, or socially powerful. But there is also well written, multi-demensional, and a big part of the story.

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